Academic health services and health needs of college students around the era of the Covid-19 pandemic

Main Article Content

Eirini Kotsalou
Evanthia Sakellari
Areti Lagiou
Evaggelia Kotsalou

Abstract

Objective: The university medical services vary around the world (even within each university), but there are only a few publications on the utilization of these services by the students. The available on-campus services of public health care might include general health care, women’s centers, mental health care, disability services, wellness resource centers, career counseling, and alcohol and other drug education programs.


Evidence Acquisition: This paper reviews the current literature on the overtime and current (due to Covid-19 pandemic) public health needs of college students based on studies that report the commonest specific diagnostic reasons for using the on-campus health care services.


Results: Special reference is done on mental health problems among students generally and the students of health professions fields (a specific category themselves). Besides, other issues of interest are the substance-related problems among students and their perceptions about mental health problems and on- campus help- seeking services.


Conclusions: It is unanimous that we need further educational and promotional campaigns to enhance the students; help-seeking behaviors, reduce stigmatizing behaviors and create more preventive public health services on campus, but also out-campus due to the Covid-19 pandemic. 

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How to Cite
Kotsalou, E., Sakellari, E., Lagiou, A., & Kotsalou, E. (2021). Academic health services and health needs of college students around the era of the Covid-19 pandemic. Medical Science and Discovery, 8(4), 193-197. https://doi.org/10.36472/msd.v8i4.505
Section
Review Article

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